Implanting chips in employees signals change in the future of work

Would you implant a chip into your hand to make the workplace a slightly easier place to be? This could be an example of the future of work, but many see this as an implementation of the all-seeing Big Brother.

The Verge reports that Wisconsin company Three Square Market will offer implantable RFID chips for workers to insert between their thumb and forefinger. These chips can help employees log into computers, buy snacks, open doors, and use office equipment. It is reported that these chips will be implanted into around 50 employees on August 1st at a party.

The chips use near field communication technology—something that a few workplaces in Europe already utilize. Beyond the office, the future of this chip technology could be used for passports, public transportation, and retail.

While Cisco has not implanted its employees with RFID chips, the company is highly invested in creating the office of the future. Cisco’s Kate O’Keeffe writes in a recent blog post that new tech like AI, VR, and robots will definitely become a part of our work. And while the company continues to shape the future, it is important to keep three specific questions in mind–

How will the worker of the future evolve?

How can technology augment the worker?

What is the workspace of the future?

Cisco’s Building 10 in San Jose has already begun to change the physical workspace, using its offices to drive collaboration and innovation with Telepresence technology. Building 10 also utilizes connected lighting, co-working spaces, and sensor technology.

Cisco’s Digital Building Solutions allows employees to set the perfect temperature, color, and lighting for their workspace. This digital lighting framework connects lighting, HVAC, security, and more over IP to increase the comfort and productivity of employees while managing building sustainability.

To learn more about what Cisco is doing for the future of work, check out more blogs here.

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