Former Lyft driver sues Uber over ‘Hell’ tracking program – CNET

A former Lyft driver is suing Uber over what he calls an invasion of privacy.

Lyft

There could be hell to pay.

A former Lyft driver has filed a lawsuit against Uber over allegations of its secret “Hell” program used to stalk the competition. Uber’s program, revealed in a report from The Information, tracked Lyft drivers through fake passenger accounts, learning when and where they were working.

Uber allegedly used the program to learn which drivers were working for it and for Lyft at the same time, and pushed more customers toward Uber drivers in an attempt to edge out their ride-sharing rivals.

The lawsuit (pdf), which seeks class action status, argues that Uber violated the Federal Wiretap Act and California’s Invasion of Privacy Act. Lawyers accused Uber of repeatedly using the Hell program “millions of times” from 2014 through 2016.

Uber has been slammed with scandals left and right in recent months, after its shady practices were revealed, including its attempt to secretly track iPhone users, its “Greyball” program to hide from police and legal battle against Alphabet’s Waymo over self-driving car tech theft.

Uber did not respond to requests for comment.

The plaintiff, Michael Gonzales, had been a Lyft driver in San Francisco from 2012 until 2014. He is arguing that Uber violated Lyft drivers’ privacy to give itself an unfair advantage.

The former Lyft driver is seeking $5 million in damages from Uber. You can read the full lawsuit here:

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